Written by John Bunyan

The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of religious English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print.

This classic book records the journey of Christian, an ‘every person’ man seeking salvation on a pilgrimage to Heaven. Along the way, Christian encounters obstacles that test his faith and characters that help show him the difference between right and wrong. Told as a dream, this 17th century religious classic’s charm stems from its eloquence and old-world humor, and from its colorful characters involved in incidents and scenes to which readers who live in a world of temptations can easily relate

Bunyan began his work while in the Bedfordshire county gaol for violations of the Conventicle Act, which prohibited the holding of religious services outside the auspices of the established Church of England. Early Bunyan scholars like John Brown believed The Pilgrim’s Progress was begun in Bunyan’s second shorter imprisonment for six months in 1675, but more recent scholars like Roger Sharrock believe that it was begun during Bunyan’s initial, more lengthy imprisonment from 1660–72 right after he had written his spiritual autobiography, Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners.